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When we lived in Edinburgh, we paid our local Tesco supermarket weekly visits. So, I can easily imagine how surprised I’d feel if I chanced upon one of the mystery poems that Metro UK recently shared.

Tesco poetry | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books

Photo by Metro

In the bakery aisle of a Coventry Tesco, a vigilante poetry-lover left a surprise. There, near the bread, was a printed poem appropriately entitled “Bread,” by W.S. Merwin, a prolific modern American poet. It begins:

Each face in the street is a slice of bread
wandering on
searching

somewhere in the light the true hunger
appears to be passing them by
they clutch

Elsewhere in the store, at the butcher’s aisle atop a piece of venison for sale, another poem appeared. This one was entitled “Deer” and came from “A Bestiary,” by Kenneth Rexroth, as the note helpfully explained.

Tesco poetry | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books

Photo by Metro

Deer are gentle and graceful
And they have beautiful eyes.
They hurt no one but themselves,
The males, and only for love.

The Cannon Park store is located close to the University of Warwick campus and some have speculated that students could be behind the messages. Still, one can’t help but wonder what a police might do with them: would a salt and buttering charge stick?